Watercoloring Succulents

Flourish_ Tag_lres.jpg

I've always loved using tags as a canvas, so of course, adding tags made out of watercolor paper to the Cosmo Cricket line was a priority! If you combine them with some paint, the Resist Pen and a waterbrush, you can easily create beautiful works of art for gift labels, bookmarks, cards, collages, or even just by themselves  in frames or even shadow boxes filled with other little trinkets.

Here's how to paint your own succulent tag.

You'll need:

  1. A Cosmo Cricket watercolor tag
  2. A waterbrush (For lettering, I love the Tim Holtz detail brush for the very fine tip.)
  3. Two or more green colors of watercolor paint. Tube watercolor is preferred.
  4. The Cosmo Cricket resist pen
  5. A pencil

(I thought I was getting film and photos of this project, only to learn we were having technical difficulties. Please excuse my digital representation of the steps!)

Use pencil to lightly draw in a succulent. To do this, start with a triangle in the center, then just added petal shapes as you work your way out.

Use pencil to lightly draw in a succulent. To do this, start with a triangle in the center, then just added petal shapes as you work your way out.

Draw your resist right inside your pencil line. It's really nice to use the wide edge of the chisel tip across the top of the petal and then thin edge on the sides.

Draw your resist right inside your pencil line. It's really nice to use the wide edge of the chisel tip across the top of the petal and then thin edge on the sides.

Use a light wash over the whole plant. This way the pencil gets fairly well covered and the resist becomes more visible for the next step.

Use a light wash over the whole plant. This way the pencil gets fairly well covered and the resist becomes more visible for the next step.

Dip the very tip of your brush into a dark color, picking up just a little. Painting one petal at a time and starting in the center, put this dark bit of paint right at the base of the petal. Then use water to pull the paint, fading it lighter as it works out to the outer edge.

Dip the very tip of your brush into a dark color, picking up just a little. Painting one petal at a time and starting in the center, put this dark bit of paint right at the base of the petal. Then use water to pull the paint, fading it lighter as it works out to the outer edge.

You can watch me do the lettering in the video below, but it's really just practice. Here are a few tips to get you started.

  1.  Dip into watercolor to start and use a pallet or scratch piece of paper to get the consistency and flow of your brush to your liking before beginning.
  2. Pull down on the down strokes, lift up on the upstrokes.
  3. When a letter calls for a counter-clockwise curve at the top (for example, cursive, lowercase "f") go slow to make the turn. Give the bristles time to catch up and follow the brush around the curve. This just takes practice.
  4. When making counter-clockwise curves at the base of letters, go fast and lift quickly. It's almost like a flick.
  5. Have fun, enjoy the process and remember, beauty is found in the imperfections!
Julie Comstock1 Comment